Thursday, November 8, 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Braces or Canker Sore

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Braces
Braces are delicate, and any foods that are sticky, chewy or hard can easily cause them to break, including:

  • ice
  • nuts
  • popcorn
  • hard candy
  • gum

Any food that you need to bite into to eat is prime for breaking braces. You can get around this by cutting the food, such as corn off the cob or rib meat off the bone, or slicing apples and chopping carrots into small, bite-size pieces. You may also experience problems eating after your braces are tightened-teeth may feel sore. The first few days are the worst, so try eating softer foods like those listed below until the soreness passes:

  • scrambled eggs
  • oatmeal
  • soup with soft vegetables or pureed or cream soups
  • soft cheeses, including cottage cheese
  • smoothies and milkshakes

Canker Sores
There is no cure for canker sores but you may be able to reduce how often you get them by avoiding foods that irritate your mouth. Spicy foods, acidic foods like pickles and sauerkraut, and citrus fruits can cause irritation. If you have canker sores, help ease discomfort by eating bland foods until your sores heal, such as: 

  • low-fat milk and other dairy foods
  • cooked, canned and frozen vegetables
  • mashed potatoes (fortify by mixing in powdered milk to boost nutrition)
  • cooked or canned fruit, including applesauce
  • hot cereals like oatmeal and cream of wheat (make with milk instead of water to boost nutrition)

If you get mouth sores, try these tips to make eating easier and speed healing:

  • Choose cool or room temperature foods.
  • Blend and moisten dry or solid foods.
  • Drink through a straw to bypass mouth sores. 
  • Eat high protein, high calorie foods to speed up healing time. For example, add protein powder to milk shakes or powdered dry milk to fortify mashed potatoes and soups.

The lists above are partial, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Thursday, November 1, 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Dry Mouth or Oral Surgery & Implants

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Dry Mouth
Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. If you have dry mouth, talk to your dentist or doctor. Dry mouth can be a sign of certain diseases or can be caused by certain medications or the result of medical treatments. If you have dry mouth:

  • don’t use tobacco or drink alcohol 
  • drink water regularly-with and between meals
  • avoid drinks that contain caffeine such as colas, coffee and tea since it can dry out your mouth
  • chew sugarless gum or suck on sugarless candy to stimulate saliva flow 
  • avoid spicy or salty foods if they cause pain in your mouth
  • moisten dry foods with soup, broth, gravy, butter or margarine, or sauce. Dip or soak your food in what you’re drinking.

Oral Surgery and Implants
Your nutrition and dietary needs following oral surgery or getting implants depends on factors including your nutritional status prior to your procedure, the extent of your procedure, how much impact there is on oral function and how long your recovery is expected to last. A liquid or soft foods diet may be required for a few days or longer, until your mouth heals. Opt for nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods and lean meats, eggs and beans whenever possible since they provide vitamins, minerals and nutrients needed for healing, including zinc, protein, and vitamins A and C.
Try these foods:

  • scrambled eggs 
  • oatmeal or cream of wheat (make with milk instead of water to boost nutrition) 
  • soup with soft vegetables or pureed or cream soups
  • soft cheeses, including cottage cheese
  • smoothies and milkshakes 

The lists above are parital, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Overcoming Dental Anxiety

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about overcoming dental anxiety.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Thursday, October 25, 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Problems Chewing or Swallowing

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Problems Chewing
Chewing problems may be caused by tooth loss, gum disease, cavities and ill-fitting dentures, so your first step should be a visit to your dentist to help determine the cause of your problem. Meanwhile, eating soft foods (see tips for braces) can you help maintain your nutrients until you can see your dentist.

Problems Swallowing
Swallowing problems can occasionally happen, but if it persists, talk to your doctor since it could be related to something serious. Causes of swallowing issues vary and treatment depends on what is causing the problem. 

If you are having trouble swallowing, to prevent choking and aspiration avoid these foods:

  • alcoholic beverages
  • extremely hot foods and beverages
  • caffeine
  • spicy foods
  • popcorn

Depending on level of swallowing difficulty, the following foods may be included in the diet. These foods are grouped into four different categories:

  • Thin liquids that dissolve quickly in the mouth such as frozen yogurt, ice cream, gelatin and broth.
  • Nectar-like liquids where liquid coats and drips off a spoon such as nectars, milkshakes, cream soup and vegetable juices. 
  • Honey-like liquids that flow off a spoon in a ribbon like in yogurt, tomato sauce and honey.
  • Spoon-thick liquids that are thickened to pudding consistency such as pudding, custard or hot cereal.

The lists above are partial, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Dental Check-ups

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about dental check-ups!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Emergency Dentistry

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about Emergency Dentistry!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Sunday, October 7, 2018

Why Are My Teeth Sensitive to Sugar?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Crest.com 

Do you have a sweet tooth, but cringe in pain every time you enjoy a sweet treat? If you have teeth sensitive to sugar, you may wonder if there’s any way to get relief. This likely means that the enamel of your teeth is damaged, and is making your teeth sensitive to sweets and other foods. Fortunately, for those whose teeth are sensitive to sugar, there are solutions to help you enjoy your favorite foods and avoid discomfort. 

To read the entire article visit Crest.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:


609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Monday, October 1, 2018

Dental Assistant

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by your Dental Assistant!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Sunday, September 30, 2018

What are Wisdom Teeth? Purpose, Symptoms & When They Come In

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Crest.com

Wisdom teeth grow in at the back of the mouth, behind your molars. There is a set on the bottom as well as the top. Wisdom teeth often grow in crooked, sideways, or otherwise misaligned. As they grow in, they can push on other teeth, causing problems of overcrowding and misalignment for them as well.

Function and Purpose of Wisdom Teeth
Wisdom teeth are believed to be "evolutionary relics," and were helpful to our distant ancestors who ate diets that consisted of rougher foods like sticks and reed plants. As teeth wore down or fell out, wisdom teeth provided replacements. Nowadays, with modern advancements in oral hygiene and softer diets, we don’t need these replacement teeth, but they still grow in. Essentially, our mouths can hold 28 teeth, but including wisdom teeth, we have about 32 teeth all vying for space. Wisdom teeth symptoms such as overcrowding, bone and nerve damage, infection, etc. can all result.

To read the entire article visit Crest.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  1. Wisdom Teeth Symptoms
  2. Wisdom Teeth Treatment
  3. Questions Related to Wisdom Teeth

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Monday, September 24, 2018

Dental Hygienist

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by your Dental Hygienist!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Sunday, September 23, 2018

Toothache: Home Remedies, Causes, Relief for Sore Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Crest.com

Common Toothache Causes
Are you wondering why your teeth hurt? If you have aching teeth, it may be due to a dental problem such as cavities, gum disease, bruxism, TMJ or a non-dental problem, such as a sinus infection or even stress.

  1. Sensitive Teeth: Some types of toothache pain occur if you are using dental care products like peroxide-based whitening agents that penetrate into your teeth causing tooth sensitivity.
  2. Bruxism: If you have aching teeth with no signs of tooth decay or gum disease, you may be experiencing bruxism. Bruxism is the technical term for grinding your teeth. Bruxism is a common cause of aching teeth that affects millions of people of all ages in the United States. If you experience aching teeth and other symptoms of bruxism, see a dental professional as soon as possible. If left untreated, chronic tooth grinding can damage crowns and fillings, and wear away tooth enamel, putting your teeth at increased risk for infection or decay. Causes of bruxism that lead to aching teeth include crooked teeth, poor jaw alignment, and stress or anxiety. If bruxism is due to misaligned teeth, straightening your bite with orthodontia could help solve the problem. But if bruxism is due to chronic stress, stress management techniques may be needed to help relieve your aching teeth. Your dental professional may recommend a mouth guard to wear at night to help prevent tooth pain associated with bruxism.
  3. Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Dysfunction: If you're stressed to the point of clenching your jaw and grinding your teeth, you can develop tooth pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is the joint that hinges the lower jaw to the skull, enabling you to eat and talk. Clenching your jaw and grinding your teeth put additional stress on the muscles of the jaw, which can cause tooth pain. If your tooth pain is caused by TMJ syndrome, your dentist may recommend a TMJ dental splint to reposition the lower jaw. But in less serious cases, warm compresses applied to the jaw, eating soft foods, and taking measures to reduce stress can help.
  4. Damaged Teeth: Your toothache pain could be caused by a cracked or broken tooth. If this is the cause of your pain, see your dentist as soon as possible. A broken tooth can contribute to tooth decay.
  5. Decayed Teeth: Tooth decay is one of the most common causes of toothache pain. Tooth decay occurs when acids from plaque bacteria penetrate into the tooth enamel causing a loss of tooth mineral which, if it progresses, can ultimately cause pain in the tooth’s inner layer, the pulp.

To read the entire article visit Crest.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:


609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Monday, September 17, 2018

Dentist: Doctors of Oral Health

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by Dentists!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Saturday, September 8, 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 3 of 3)

Don’t replace fillings just because they’re old 











When you have a cavity, the dentist removes it and puts in a filling. These fillings can last for many years, but some people get silver fillings removed because they don’t like the color. However, the process of removing a filling can weaken the tooth. Additionally, insurance may not cover the removal. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Saturday, September 1, 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 2 of 3)

Ask about all the options for calming your child during dental procedures 











Dental work can be scary for some kids. Talk with your dentist about ways to help your child stay calm. Tips for a successful dental visit can include making sure your child is not hungry before their dental appointment and scheduling an appointment at the proper time of day.

For jaw pain, try conservative treatments first 











Jaw pain can be caused by stress, arthritis or an injury. A treatment plan for jaw pain should first consist of actions like exercises and anti-inflammatory drugs.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Friday, August 31, 2018

Diet & Your Teeth

Learn more about the connection between your teeth and what you eat.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Saturday, August 25, 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 1 of 3)

Use toothpaste with fluoride for infants and children 











For children younger than 3 years, you should begin brushing a child’s teeth with fluoride toothpaste in an amount no larger than a grain of rice. For children 3 to 6 years of age, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.

Consider sealants to prevent decay or treat beginning cavities on the back teeth 











Dental sealants act as a barrier to prevent cavities. They are a plastic material applied by a dentist to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay occurs most often.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Friday, August 24, 2018

Lifestyle & Your Oral Health

Learn more about how your lifestyle can affect your oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Friday, August 17, 2018

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

How Safe Is Tooth Whitening?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com 

Over a decade of research has proven bleaching and other whitening methods to be both safe and effective. Several products in the market today have shown no adverse effects on teeth or gums in substantial clinical and laboratory testing. Be sure to look for clinically proven products, follow directions and consult with your dental professional.

In the past, the higher bleach concentrations used in-office treatment resulted in more sensitivity. Today, however, bleaching gels are well buffered, making sensitivity less of an issue. Sensitivity may occur in people after whitening procedures, particularly when they eat hot or cold foods, but usually disappears after 48 hours and stops completely when treatment is stopped.

If you do experience sensitivity, there are several ways you can help eliminate it:

  • If using a tray applicator, wear the tray for a shorter period
  • Brush with a toothpaste made for sensitive teeth that contains potassium nitrate to help soothe tooth nerve ending
  • Ask your dentist or pharmacist for a product with fluoride, which helps re-mineralize your teeth. Brush-on or wear in your trays four minutes prior to and after whitening your teeth
  • Stop whitening your teeth for several days to allow you teeth to adapt to the whitening process. Within 24 hours, the sensitivity will cease. The longer you whiten your teeth, the less sensitivity you will experience

In a few cases, your dentist may discourage dental bleaching:

  • If you have gum disease, teeth with worn enamel, cavities or particularly sensitive teeth
  • If you're pregnant or breast-feeding
  • If you have tooth-colored crowns, caps or other dental work in your front teeth, which can't be bleached

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Bruxism: Signs And Symptoms

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com 

What is Bruxism?
If you find yourself waking up with sore jaw muscles or a headache, you may be suffering from bruxism - the grinding and clenching of teeth. Bruxism can cause teeth to become painful or loose, and sometimes parts of the teeth are literally ground away. Eventually, bruxism can destroy the surrounding bone and gum tissue. It can also lead to problems involving the jaw joint, such as temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ).

How do I Know if I Have Bruxism?
For many people, bruxism is an unconscious habit. They may not even realize they're doing it until someone comments that they make a horrible grinding sound while sleeping. For others, a routine dental checkup is when they discover their teeth are worn or their tooth enamel is fractured.
Other potential signs of bruxism include aching in the face, head and neck. Your dentist can make an accurate diagnosis and determine if the source of facial pain is a result from bruxism.

How is Bruxism Treated?
The appropriate treatment for you will depend on what is causing the problem. By asking careful questions and thoroughly examining your teeth, your dentist can help you determine the potential source of your bruxism. Based on the amount of tooth damage and its likely cause, your dentist may suggest:

  • Wearing an appliance while sleeping - custom-made by your dentist to fit your teeth, the appliance slips over the upper teeth and protects them from grinding against the lower teeth. While an appliance is a good way to manage bruxism, it is not a cure.
  • Finding ways to relax - Because everyday stress seems to be a major cause of bruxism, anything that reduces stress can help-listening to music, reading a book, taking a walk or a bath. It may help to seek counseling to learn effective ways for handling stressful situations. Also, applying a warm, wet washcloth to the side of your face can help relax muscles sore from clenching.
  • Reducing the "high spots" of one or more teeth to even your bite - An abnormal bite, one in which teeth do not fit well together, may also be corrected with new fillings, crowns or orthodontics.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Learn more about the importance of saliva.

Learn more about the importance of saliva.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

The Value Of A Teeth X-Ray

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Steve Auger

When you hear the word "X-ray," there's a tendency to envision a youngster sitting around an ER waiting to see if he or she has a broken bone incurred playing sports or just horsing around. But X-rays are just as important to dentists' offices as they are to those of orthopedists. A teeth X-ray is invaluable to any dentist in the maintenance of good oral health when treating a patient. Here's exactly what they are and how dentists incorporate them into their practices.

X-RAYS
Your dentist visually examines all aspects of your teeth and gums during a typical checkup. A teeth X-ray, however, is a diagnostic tool that allows your dentist to gauge your mouth health through factors he can't see with the naked eye, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). Also called radiographs, X-rays can reveal common issues such as cavities, tooth decay and periodontal disease, all the way to more complex problems such as jaw infections and oral cysts. X-rays aren't just for adults though. Dentists take x-rays of children's teeth for some of the same reasons as adults but also some different reasons.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Children and the dentist
  • Reasons for child teeth x-rays
  • X-ray safety for children

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Why Do Gums Recede?

Learn more about why gums recede.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Sunday, July 8, 2018

7 MouthHealthy Tips for Your Summer Soiree (Part 3 of 3)

Crush, Don’t Cube 
Ice may be your best friend on a hot day, but it's no friend to your teeth. That's because chewing on hard foods, such as ice, can leave your teeth vulnerable to a dental emergency such as a broken tooth and can even damage enamel. If you can, put cans and bottles in a huge tub of ice so your guests won’t be tempted to crunch a few cubes when they’re done with their drinks. If you need ice to put in a glass, use crushed

Serve Infused Water 
Soda and sports drinks are some of the worst drinks for your teeth. They eat away at your teeth, cause dry mouth and are full of sugar. Water, however, is one of the best things you can sip, so serve up a healthy drink with a twist of whatever fruit you’d like. Infused waters are low in sugar and super hydrating. (Just go easy on citrus fruits. The acid in lemons and limes can be harsh on your teeth.) Bonus: Pitchers of infused water will also look beautiful on your table.

Keep Gum Handy 
Your guests may be looking for something to freshen their breath after dinner. Swap out a bowl of mints for a dish of sugar-free gum. Studies using gum with the ADA Seal show that chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals may help prevent tooth decay. Chewing sugar-free gum gets saliva flowing to wash away food and fights acids produced by cavity-causing bacteria from eating away your teeth.

To read the entire article visit Mouthhealthy.org

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132

Sunday, July 1, 2018

7 MouthHealthy Tips for Your Summer Soiree (Part 2 of 3)

The Trouble with Toothpicks 
Serving corn on the cob or pulled pork? Your guests may need something to get food unstuck from their teeth. A toothpick is sharp and can pierce gums, giving bacteria a chance to get in. And no one wants a mouth splinter if it breaks. Instead, leave dental picks in a covered dish in the bathroom, or replace toothpicks on the table with soft, flexible, wooden plaque removers like Stim-U-Dent.


Go Seedless
You can also cut down on food getting stuck in your guests’ teeth by serving seedless foods. Opt for hot dog and hamburger buns without sesame and poppy seeds. Use crunchy fruits in your fruit salad instead of raspberries, kiwi and blackberries, and serve seedless watermelon.

To read the entire article visit Mouthhealthy.org

609-T East Main Street 
Purcellville, VA 20132